11 new gene variants linked to Alzheimer’s disease

In the largest genetic analysis of Alzheimer’s ever completed, scientists have discovered 11 new genes that may be tied to the late-onset form of the dementia disease.

Scientists scanned the brains of 74,076 older volunteers with Alzheimer’s and others who did not have the disease in 15 countries to come up with their findings. The study was published in Nature Genetics on Oct. 27.

Prior to this study, only 11 gene variants had been linked to late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, including one called Apolipoprotein E-e4 (APOE-e4) which appeared to have the strongest impact on risk.

Now, with the latest research, scientists have doubled the known gene variants linked to the disease.

These genes may play a role in how cells function, including how microglial cells (cells that form the support structure of the central nervous system) react to areas of inflammation. Other gene variants were shown to affect brain cell function and synaptic function in the hippocampus, which is the area of the brain responsible for memory and learning.

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